Antigua Ruins : La Recolección

Monasterio Y Templo De La Recolección was built in the early 1700s and severely damaged by several earthquakes since it’s construction. It costs international tourists $5 (40 Quetzales) to enter the grounds and will take most people about an hour to walk around the grounds. Students receive a discount and will only need to pay 20 Quetzales or roughly $2.50 USD. The ruins are located very close to the bus station in town and not much farther away from the main market as well.

It feels a bit odd walking around the ruins as there are several tons of rubble and masonry still lying around in the church. Somehow it seems like the earthquake could have destroyed the church just days ago even though it has been several years. I would recommend visiting La Recoleccion ruins for this odd feeling alone.

Take a look around for yourself…


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Antigua Ruins : Church and Convent Of Santa Clara

Only three blocks from where I currently reside are the ruins of the Santa Clara Church and Convent. The entrance fee is 40 Quetzales for foreign visitors and slightly less for students. The original temple and convent was built in 1705. This version was completed in 1734 but has been damaged severely by earthquakes since its construction. The grounds are pleasant to walk around and to imagine what it must have been like to live here in the past. Particularly impressive are the arches surrounding the central courtyard and fountain. The ruins are located at the corner of 6th Street East and 2nd Avenue South, only three blocks from Parque Central. Be sure to watch the video slideshow at the bottom of the page to see more of the ruins.

exterior entrance for parishioners to the temple

parishioners entrance to the temple


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Antigua Ruins : San Jose el Viejo

This ruin is only a few blocks away from where I am living. I saw it the first week I was in Antigua and I was immediately drawn to it. San Jose el Viejo is now a Spanish school. When I see this place I can’t help but think of my grandfather. He worked for decades at a brickyard. I wonder if any of those bricks made it into a building like San Jose el Viejo.

After the church was originally constructed Phillip V ordered it closed. Later the church was allowed to reopen with royal permission. San Jose el Viejo was severely damaged by a major earthquake in 1773 but has been restored. The ruins are located on 5th Avenue South and 8th Street West. Today the ruins are used for special events such as weddings and graduations.


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